Reyes & Associates, P.C.
Pasadena Office

3219 E. Foothill Blvd. 
Pasadena, CA 91107
Phone: (213) 383-6244
Fax: (213) 383-6243

info@reyeslawpc.com

Reyes & Associates, P.C.
San Diego Office

1761 Hotel Circle South, Suite #270
San Diego, CA 92108
Phone: (619) 546-8110
Fax: (619) 546. 8107

info@reyeslawpc.com

Important Disclaimer: This website is attorney advertising. The information included on this site is meant for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice and does not establish an attorney-client relationship.

Aviso Importante: Este sitio web es la publicidad del abogado. La información incluida en este sitio es para propósitos informativos solamente y no constituye consejo legal y no establece una relación abogado-cliente.

Never Talk to the Police

To put things simply, talking to the police cannot help you. The best thing to do is to remain silent.

When you speak to police, you risk confessing or just providing them with the information they can use to charge you with a crime. 

 

You are at a disadvantage when talking to the police. They are trained in getting admissions and confessions from people.

Remember:

 

  • What you say to the police during a police stop CAN be used against you.

  • Police officers may attempt to mislead you into incriminating yourself.

  • Officers may misunderstand what you say, intentionally or accidentally.

  • You may admit to knowing some facts which can be used to prove your involvement or knowledge of a crime.

  • Some people feel the need to lie to the police during the interview, which may put you under suspicion, and later affect your credibility (whether a judge or jury believes you).

  • The police officer may put words into your mouth and claim that you made incriminating statements, when in reality, you did not.

  • Police do not have the authority to make deals with you or give you leniency. That is up to the prosecutor.

  • Even if you believe you are guilty, there is no need to rush into a confession. Circumstances may change and a criminal defense attorney may be able to spot flaws or errors in your case that can be used at a later time to have your charges reduced or dismissed.

  • Even if you believe you are innocent, facts can be misconstrued; you may tell a white lie, and you may say something that may be used against you if you decide to talk.

Provide Identifying Information Only

While anyone being questioned should remain silent, there are some things you should say when asked by police.
 

You should always provide your personal identifying information such as your name, date of birth and your address.

You do not have to speak further than that. Exercise your Fifth Amendment right to remain silent and not incriminate yourself. 

 

Invoke your Fifth Amendment right by stating you do not wish to talk without first consulting a lawyer.
 

  • DO NOT agree to an interview.

  • DO NOT attempt to make a deal with an officer.

  • DO NOT make any comment or statement.